The Southwest Collection’s 2015 Highlights

2015 is coming to a close, and the SWC is looking back at some of its favorite images of the past year. (Also, because no one is in the archive for the holidays, we shamefully admit to the necessity having to recycle content!) So here they are – the best of 2015!

The year is wrapping up, and so we bring the SWC’s favorite images from 2015!Back in July we noted that archives have nigh innumerable boxes. But when the Ag Movement tractors and I asked our Registrar to come up with a box-related joke, he replied “If they wanted us to use good grammar they should have made it more easier.”He stands by that statement to this day.

For example, back in July we noted that archives have nigh innumerable boxes. But when the Ag Movement tractors and I asked our Registrar to come up with a box-related joke, he replied “If they wanted us to use good grammar they should have made it more easier.” He stands by that statement to this day.

Less silly but equally entertaining is this footage of our Earth as seen through the first color satellite footage ever taken from space! Well, the footage of the earth is real. As a savvy user pointed out, however, the background and its immobile stars probably aren’t…

ranchers feed yard

Every other Wednesday around here is dubbed “Western,” y’all, but sometimes we eschew the rodeos, cowboys, and ranching for a classic Ford Fairlane station wagon.

title shot

In January, we installed an exhibit on Texas Tech’s Dairy Barn, a 90-year-old symbol of the campus, still preserved today just yards away from the Southwest Collection. Here’s a photograph of it today, surrounded by our crowded campus, and then, surrounded by…pretty much nothing!

Lubbockhistorichomes - need to chop up - 1988 for tumblr4

While every other Wednesday is “Western Wednesday” around here, all the remaining Wednesdays are “Map Day!” One of our most popular maps this year was, curiously, this 1988 map of historic homes and buildings in Lubbock, Texas, produced by the Lubbock Heritage Society and some of their partners.

keep on streakin

We see many bizarre advertisements in our newspaper collections, but few are like the one we found in the spring of 1974: an obsession with streaking in Texas Tech University’s University Daily. No one knows how it started. Some say that streaking had been popular on campus for years already. Others claim that Ray Stevens’ hit, “The Streak,” which debuted in March 1974, was responsible. All we know for sure is that by the time the campus got good and warm, t-shirts featuring the logo above were widely available.

3.l-54.80 female and baby in rebozo beside removable plank door- near village of Wawatzerare

Finally, we have an image from one of our favorite blogs this year. It described our photograph collection of the Tarahumara, a people of the Sierra Madre Mountains of Chihuahua, Mexico, who’ve weathered centuries of attention by Spanish, French, and Mexican governments. They still hold on to many of their original cultural traditions. In the village of Wawatzerare, for example, this woman still carries her baby in a rebozo. This shot was snagged by Father Luis Verplancken, a Jesuit who served in Chihuahua for decades, and who created all of these photographs.

So there you have it: a taste of our favorite images of the year. Keep an eye out for next year’s stuff. It’s bound to be as good (or even better!)

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“Mad Trends: Found Ads of the 1970s” – An Exhibit at the Southwest Collection

We love poring through old issues of Texas Tech’s student newspaper, The Toreador (or the University Daily, depending on the vintage.) In blogs past, we shared the phenomenon of streaking that overtook campus, and therefore its newspapers, during the 1970s. But naked folks weren’t the only entertainment on the Toreador’s pages. Newspaper advertisements got pretty innovative, and we’ve installed an exhibit full of examples to prove it. Check these samples out.

thor ladies night

In February 1974 The Comix Club bar was a popular institution. Students and locals gathered there regularly to drink and carouse, yea like unto the fallen warriors of Valhalla. Now, we won’t delve deep into the details of their storied parties, but we can confirm that Norse god of thunder and Marvel Comics staple, Thor, endorsed their neverending parade of ladies’ nights.

gandalf

Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings novels were hugely popular in the 1960s and 70s. It’s unsurprising therefore that stores such as Gandalf’s Staff would take advantage of that popularity to sell items that featured prominently in the books. Such as…water beds? Note also that, just in case you struggle to identify wizards on sight, or were confused by the name of the store, they captioned the picture of Gandalf.

king kong

King Kong debuted in theaters in 1933, and after a two-decade hiatus got an original, uncut screening in February 1974 at Lubbock’s Backstage Theater. We love that the woman is screaming the title of the movie, rather than for, you know, help. Stylistically, though, it made sense, as the poster was drawn in the style of Robert Crumb’s Zap Comix of the late 1960s. Those were the cartoons that proclaimed “Keep on Truckin’” – another fad appropriated by the Toreador from time to time.

flash gordon

In 1974, you could rest assured that the universe was safe from Ming, Mars, and planets full of outlaws. Featuring “the latest in modern electronic space equipment,” the Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers films had been wowing audiences for over 40 years, and did so again in December 1974 at the Backstage Theater. Buck and Flash were true heroes, the kind that save maidens from deaths worse than fate! Whatever that means. Heroes don’t have time to keep clichés straight.

Enjoy these? You might also enjoy the rest of our exhibit, which features 1970s mustache products, Gene Roddenberry, plagiarism from Jaws intended to sell hamburgers, and a Martian death ray! Or just check out issues of the University Daily/Toreador among our digital collections. Either way, you’ll be entertained.

Ads Laid Bare: Streakin’ through TTU’s “University Daily”!

keep on streakin UD_1974_03_01-1We see many bizarre stories and advertisements in our newspapers here at the SWC, but few are as wacky as the obsession with streaking we observed in Texas Tech University’s University Daily during the spring of 1974. No one knows how it all started. Some say that streaking had been popular on campus for a few years already. Others claim that Ray Stevens’ hit, “The Streak,” which debuted in March 1974, was responsible. All that we know for sure is that by the time the campus got good and warm, t-shirts featuring the logo above were widely available. full color streaker shirt ad - also van heusen UD_1974_04_17-4Illicitly sold t-shirts weren’t the only clothes to cover up streakers before their antics, or so this April 1974 ad for Van Heusen dress shirts would have you believe. “For revealing your colors in a most original way, streaking can hardly be overlooked!” But go ahead and buy a stylish, daring, and adventurous Van Heusen anyway. Perhaps to look good for your court date. streaker burger brittany UD_1974_03_15-5According to this ad from The Brittany, there was even a 1974 Streak Week from March 14th to the 17th. Although University Daily accounts are spotty on that matter, they didn’t shy away from letting The Brittany advertise its Streaker Burger, a hamburger with “just ‘Meat and Buns.’” We’re not sure about the quality of their burgers, but the litany of puns in their description are fairly tasteless. That’s right, Brittany – we can pun, too! streaker punch UD_1974_04_24-4Sometimes streakers needed to build up some courage, and warmth, before they could run the streets. Fortunately, Montezuma tequila had the solution: Streaker Punch, made by mixing their booze in a wash tub with some fruit, then chugging it out of a paper cup. Whatever works, we suppose? Anyway, these freewheeling issues of the University Daily (also sometimes called The Toreador or The Daily Toreador) can be found among our many digital collections. Head on over and browse through them!